Leading image

Les bienfaits des données ouvertes pour l'agriculture et la nutrition

Près d’une personne sur neuf souffre de la faim ou de la malnutrition dans le monde. Pour s’attaquer à ce problème, l’agenda politique mondial sur la sécurité alimentaire mise de plus en plus sur les données. Comment une chose aussi abstraite que des données peut-elle servir à lutter contre une menace mondiale aussi réelle que la faim et la malnutrition ?

Dans ce numéro

Pourquoi se focaliser sur les données ?

par et

En septembre 2016 s’est tenu à New York le premier sommet de l’initiative GODAN (Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition). Et, en février 2017, s’est tenu, à La Haye, aux Pays-Bas, le troisième atelier international sur les conséquences des données ouvertes pour l’agriculture et l’alimentation.

par et

Au troisième workshop international consacré à l’impact des données ouvertes sur l’agriculture, un nouvel agenda d’action a été examiné par un ensemble d’organisations diverses.

Innovators, programmers, and application developers are at the forefront of a movement that combines big data, open data, and the internet of things to create new marketable products and services for the agricultural sector. Events, like hackathons, pitching and networking gatherings, are important for these young innovators to improve and exchange ideas, get technological advice, connect to investors and marketers.

Demand is growing for gender data and targeted solutions for challenges unique to women, men, girls or boys. In Kenya, a community gathers and discusses gender citizen-generated data, which are uploaded to mobile phones and distributed to women leaders.

There is much potential for open data to positively affect the future of agriculture. But without a proactive, responsible approach, there is a very real risk of these changes benefiting only the most powerful actors within the sector.

Getting open data benefits to farmers will be crucial if the move towards open access is to have any real impact. There is a lot potential, but lack of reliable and contextualised data is currently working against smallholder farmers.

par

Open data research can significantly help to stimulate changes in practices and organisation of the public and private sector actors in agriculture and food supply chains, but it cannot force those changes. Crucial are the researchers themselves, who need to interact to ensure their knowledge and expertise is used and useful.

Increasing the open access to nutrition and food data for ICT developers has resulted in a surge in applications for a healthier food intake and better fitness.

par

It sounds simple, open data is there for anyone to access. However, not all journalists are aware of the open data available to them or how to use it when writing about food security or the critical challenges facing agriculture. Good journalism is not based on opinions, it relies on evidence-based information.

The Kenya government initiated the Open Data Initiative in 2011 on the idea that Kenya's information is a national asset. Agriculture is one of the main pillars, because food security and economic development can only move forward if decisions on agriculture are evidence-based. To be successful, data needs to be available, accurate, and open for all.

Wouldn’t it be handy if you could just switch on that app and see the agricultural (or any other) sector through a gender lens? And what if everyone else also working in the agricultural sector just magically started to use it? Would it make us do things differently, collect different data, push for the release and visualisation of other types of datasets, or would we make sure the data were more equally accessed and used?

En septembre 2016 s’est tenu à New York le premier sommet de l’initiative GODAN (Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition). Et, en février 2017, s’est tenu, à La Haye, aux Pays- Bas, le troisième atelier international sur les conséquences des données ouvertes pour l’agriculture et l’alimentation. Les deux événements ont présenté les progrès réalisés pour fournir aux décideurs, aux agriculteurs et au secteur privé, un meilleur accès à des informations exactes et en temps utile en vue de façonner une agriculture plus durable.

Derniers numéros

Spore N° 91

L’agriculture ACP de nouvelle génération - Les innovations qui marchent

Spore N° 90

Les femmes et la digitalisation de l’agriculture

Spore N° 89

Data4Ag - De nouvelles opportunités pour les petits exploitants

Spore N° 88

Libérer le potentiel de la blockchain pour l’agriculture

Spore N° 87

Données météorologiques pour l'agriculture

Tous les magazines